Posts in category: Travel

Did you know that, in terms of production and acreage, Bordeaux is the largest wine region in France? While those 300,000 acres of vineyard can keep any traveler occupied for days, the surrounding area boasts a number of sites you won’t want to miss. From elegant and grandiose chateaux’s to climbing Europe’s largest sand dune, there’s something for everyone in this beautiful part of France. After having your fill of some of the best wines the world has to offer, check out these 5 best day trips from Bordeaux. Whether you’re looking for adventure, history, or more wine tastings, we’ve found day trips to suit your needs. Learn more about the best day trips from Bordeaux below and start planning your unforgettable trip today. 1. Saint Émilion Located just 35 kilometers northeast of Bordeaux is the medieval village of Saint Émilion. Nestled between Castillon-la-Bataille and Libourne, the village takes its name from the 8th century travelling monk who settled in a hermitage here. While the monks who followed him were responsible for the beginnings of commercial wine production in the area, vineyards have been planted here as early as the 2nd century. Today, Saint Émilion is a UNESCO world heritage site and one of the best day trips from Bordeaux if you’re looking for history, beauty, and a little of what Bordeaux is famous for (aka wine). The streets are dotted with Romanesque churches, medieval ruins, and narrow, cobbled streets that will take you back in time. And with our guided tour of this historic town, you’ll get 8 hours-worth of exploration, food, and wine tasting. 2. Visit Châteaux’s in Bordeaux (Via Public Transport) The Bordeaux region houses no less than 6,000 different chateaux’s – any one of which makes for a great Bordeaux day trip. The best part? The…

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By 2023, the global wine market is expected to generate over $423 billion USD in revenues. One of the oldest and most popular wines on that world market is Bordeaux wine. And if you’re a wine lover who didn’t know that, then you’re definitely going to need some help sounding like an expert on Bordeaux wine tours. If you want to sound like a connoisseur on your next vineyard tour, you should know important details about where it comes from, what makes it special, and what it costs. Throwing in some facts and figures about the region itself couldn’t hurt your case, either. Before heading out on your tour, arm yourself with those facts and more, with this guide to French Bordeaux wine. What is French Bordeaux Wine? French Bordeaux wine is the only kind of Bordeaux wine there is. That is, it’s only considered Bordeaux if it’s produced in this wine region in France. That goes for both the red and white varieties coming from Bordeaux, though the region is primarily associated with its unique red blends. In fact, 90% of the wine produced in the region is of the red variety. The blend is a combination of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, but the proportion of each varies according to the specific part of the Bordeaux wine region the wine is produced. Some winemakers blend additional wines into their final product, including Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc, and/or Malbec, as well. All You Need to Know About the Bordeaux Wine Region Bordeaux has been a major port city in France for centuries. That strategic location allowed wine makers to get their wines into the glasses of people around the world for a very long time. But the ability to access different regions does not a great wine make. Bordeaux also…

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If you’re planning a trip to Portugal, a stop in Porto is a must. Luckily, it’s only 313 kilometers (about 195 miles) from Lisbon and easy to reach from the capital city. Downtown Porto is a UNESCO World Heritage Site with a historic center and colorful houses. It’s also the birthplace of port wine and home to plenty of wineries where you can sip the sweet drink. If that’s not tempting enough, a few days in Porto could also include seafood, beaches, bike rides, hiking, or even a boat cruise in the lush Douro Valley. So, what’s the best way to get there? There are six popular options for transportation between Lisbon and Porto, and we’ve gathered all the details in one place. Use this guide to decide which one works best for you! How to get from Lisbon to Porto by Bus Price: 19 euros Time: 3.5 hours Stations: Lisboa Sete Rios or Lisboa Oriente Reservation needed? Yes Best for: Budget travelers The most popular bus service from Lisbon to Porto is Rede Expressos. Buses leave once or twice an hour between 6:15 in the morning and 12:30 at night, and you can find the complete Rede Expressos bus schedule here. The bus is a convenient transport option because they leave from both the Sete Rios bus station in the northwest of the city and the Oriente station in the northeast. Both are connected to central Lisbon by public transport. The time of the trip varies based on which station you leave from, but it’s about 3.5 hours to get from Lisbon to Porto by bus and the cost per ticket is 19 euros. The route is direct and although there are stops along the way, you won’t have to disembark or change buses. Just remember this is a…

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There’s so much to do in California that it can be intimidating. Whether you’re spending the entire two weeks visiting San Francisco, or you’re driving all over the state, you’ll need quite the list of items to bring with you. Read on to learn about the ten most important things to bring and then book your tour with Go Car Tours. Basic items you’ll need Before we get into the specifics, let’s cover the basic items you want to make sure you bring: Clothing, camera, bathing suit, maps and travel guides, hiking / running shoes, passport / visa if needed, items to keep you safe from the sun, toiletries, first-aid kit, and a carry-on pouch. 10 steps to packing like a pro As you take off on your incredible two-week California vacation, follow these ten tips to pack everything you’ll need. Check the weather forecast in the week before your trip to decide what clothing you’ll need. Pack some extra underwear and socks but otherwise only pack clothing for three to four days. Skip clothes that wrinkle. Stay in a hotel that has laundry facilities, or find a nearby laundromat. Bring a bathing suit and towel. Even if you don’t think you’ll be swimming it’s better to be prepared. Keep an eye out for dress codes when making reservations. If you’re eating at a posh restaurant, a simple dress or nice pair of pant should suffice. Bring the right shoes. If you’ll be hiking, bring hiking shoes. If you’re going to be simply taking in the sites at your leisure, you’ll want cozy walking shoes. Protect yourself from the sun by bringing sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat. Bring a small pouch you can wear for your valuables. Bring both a toiletry bag and a first-aid kit. Make both of them…

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