There’s a lot to love about San Diego – including having some of the best beaches in the country. No visit to San Diego would be quite complete without a trip to the beach. There are beaches you can swim at, beaches you can sun at, and beaches with unique wildlife. Check out our five top picks for San Diego beaches. 1. La Jolla Cove La Jolla Cove may be a tiny beach, but it’s truly gorgeous. Sandwiched between sandstone cliffs, visitors are treated to blue-green bay views, snorkelers have plenty to explore, and scuba divers can check out some of the most unique sea creatures in California. This area is part of the La Jolla Underwater Park Ecological Reserve and has unique fish such as the Garibaldi. 2. La Jolla Shores You’ve only got to head north about a mile from La Jolla Cove to get to La Jolla Shores. This is a several mile long beach that’s beloved for having a gentle surf. As a result, it’s a top choice for people who are just learning to surf, people who enjoy stand up paddle boarding, and parents with young kids. It’s also the only beach within the limits of San Diego that has a boat launch. 3. Swami’s Beach Located south of Encinitas, about 25 miles from San Diego, Swami’s Beach is a top spot for surfers. For those who aren’t quite ready to brave the waves, people watching is prime from the bluff-top park. Sit there and take in some of the scenery Southern California has on offer. 4. Carlsbad State Beach For those who want nothing more than to take in a stunning California sunset, GoCar Tours has you covered. Head out to Carlsbad Beach to see the sun slide into the Pacific Ocean. This is…

Read More...

Traveling on a honeymoon is a unique opportunity to see the world in a way you might not otherwise see it. San Francisco has an almost endless list of things to do, many of which are perfect for honeymooners. Read on to learn more about them and then reach out to GoCar Tours to book the tour of a lifetime. 1. Head straight for Golden Gate Park Golden Gate Park offers incredible photo opportunities, lush gardens, and incredible blooms. Make sure you make it through the entire park, including the Conservatory of Flowers. There you’ll see almost every type of flower imaginable. 2. Have a bite to eat Fisherman’s Wharf Locals will tell you that Fisherman’s Wharf isn’t what it used to be. They’ll tell you that what was once pure has now become a tourist attraction. While it is true that it’s changed over the years, and that some aspects of lost their initial charm, it’s still a magical, unique place that’s well worth a stop. In fact, we suggest you get there hungry and eat some of the freshest seafood available in the world. 3. Get your creep on at Alcatraz There’s a ton of history to be experienced in San Francisco, and a trip to Alcatraz Island is necessary if you want to see it all. There’s no question that visiting is an intense experience but it will also ground you in California and in the past in a way that wouldn’t otherwise be possible. 4. Do it all at the California Academy of Sciences There’s something for everyone at the California Academy of Sciences. Do you like watching fish in their natural habitat? Then check out the aquarium. Do you love outer space and marvel at the planets? Then the planetarium may be your favorite spot….

Read More...

When planning an international trip, there are a wide range of factors to consider. One of them is to decide how long to stay. Some people have a specific amount of time to spend while others are more flexible and try to find the right balance between feeling rushed and staying so long that they are ready to go home. If you’re planning a trip to Barcelona then there are many factors that can help you decide. What time of year are you traveling? The time of year you’ll be spending in Barcelona can make a difference in a variety of ways. First, if you’re traveling in peak tourist time then you can expect for everything to take longer, from getting from one side of town to another, to getting a seat at a restaurant, to getting through the major tourist attractions. If you’re planning to travel during the rainy season then you should plan for at least half of your time to be spent indoors and this can affect how long you need to stay. Finally, look to see if there are any special festivals going on that you might want to see. Some of the fall festivals Barcelona is known for can make your trip days longer if you want to see everything. How will you be getting around? It’s true that Barcelona is a smaller city compared to others in Spain, and that it’s easy to get around, but if you’re going to rely on public transportation then you should plan to only do one or two things per day. The other option is to rent a car, which allows you to see and do more in a single day but can be a lot more expensive. Of course, GoCar tours offers a compromise: The Barcelona Some…

Read More...

The Golden Gate Bridge is one of the most frequently visited sites in the San Francisco area. Many tourists can easily see that it’s a massive, impressive, staggering work of engineering but they don’t always know some of the fascinating history behind it. Goldengatebridge.org has a ton of interesting information, including a list of Frequently Asked Questions. Here are three of our favorite facts. 1. The Golden Gate Bridge once had the world’s largest suspension span As the website states, “The 4,200-foot long suspension span of the Golden Gate Bridge was the longest span in the world from the time of its construction in 1937 until New York City’s Verrazano Narrows Bridge was opened on November 21, 1964.  It is 60 feet longer than the Golden Gate Bridge.  The Verrazano was the longest single span bridge until July 17, 1981, when the Humber Bridge in England, spanning the Humber River, was opened for traffic with a main span of 4,626 feet. Today, both the Great Belt East Bridge in Denmark (main span of 5,328 feet) and the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge in Japan (main span of 6,532 feet) have main span lengths which exceed that of the Humber Bridge.  The table below shows the relative suspension bridges in comparison. 2. The name has nothing to do with its color While it’s obvious today that the name isn’t related to its color, many tourists assume that it was once gold. In fact, according to the website, “The term Golden Gate refers to the Golden Gate Strait which is the entrance to the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean.  The strait is approximately three-miles long by one-mile wide with currents ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 knots.  It is generally accepted that the strait was named “Chrysopylae” or Golden Gate by Army Captain John…

Read More...

Madrid is one of Europe’s most historically rich cities. Its documented history traces back to the ninth century, but the area in fact has been inhabited by humans since prehistoric times. Here are some selected highlights from the history of Madrid, Spain’s capital city: -The area now known as Madrid was inhabited by prehistoric humans. Numerous ancient objects have been uncovered in excavations along the banks of the River Manzanares, such as axes and large mammal remains, as evidence. -Originally named Mayrit, the city of Madrid was founded by the emir Muhammad at the close of the ninth century A.D. The city came to prominence during the Arab occupation of the Iberian peninsula, but passed into Christian hands during the Reconquest of Spain by the Christians. -The present location of Madrid—in Spain’s center—was established in 1083 by King Alfonso I. All prevalent symbols of Muslim influence and rule were removed during this period. -In 1329, King Fernando V assembled the famed Court of Madrid for the first time ever. This preceded one of the darker periods in Spanish history, the Spanish Inquisition. -In the 14th and 15th centuries, in the wake of the Reconquista, Moors and Jews banded together and formed a concentrated population in Madrid—named Moreria to this day. In 1494 they were all denounced as “unbelievers” and expelled from Spain. Mosques and other Muslim imagery once again disappeared from the area. -On May 2nd, 1808, a revolt began in the Puerta de Sol—thus beginning the War of Independence. The large-scale war, in which the Spanish fought against Napoleon and their former allies in France, has given rise to a number of patriotic memorials in the city of Madrid. The Plaza Dos de Mayo is the most famous of these. -In 1835, the world-famous University of Alcala de Henares…

Read More...

Going down the Lombard St in San Francisco in a go cart ……. wheeeeeeee

Read More...